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2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 13,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 5 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

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Enerjetik LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Precision Pipe and Vessel has applied for world wide patent protection for advanced and improved design for gas production technology.

The EJ2 Gas Generation System eliminates the need for expensive alloys and uses materials that are readily available and commonly used in oil, gas, and other chemical plants. The improved system integrates and simplifies gasification virtually eliminating many of the moving parts. This improvement increases the operation time and reliability and reduces capital costs compared to other technologies.  Many uses of biomass, waste materials, low, and or negative value feedstock can be implemented into the EJ2 and would create high value energy products. 

Enerjetik has filed for additional patent protection for the onsite production of Co2 for enhanced oil recovery downstream of the EJ2 gasification system.  The useful volume of produced Co2 rich gas will have a high purity and will be free of nitrogen compounds and other byproducts associated with gasification.  The Co2 can be used for oil well stimulation and other uses.  

Data used to describe the benefits of this technology has been derived from operations of the pilot plant located in Denver, Colorado and verified by third parties.  Over the past three years the company has processed a wide variety of carbon feedstocks including coal, animal waste, municipal waste, tire derived fuel, wood chips, brewers grains and other materials.  

 

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EJ2 Gasifier

Syngas & EOR gas production facility

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2011 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 3,900 times in 2011. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 3 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

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One of my favorite things about working here at Precision is that we practice  Manage By Wandering Around.  (MBWA as Introduced by Peters/ Waterman in the book, In Search of Excellence)  While the authors were doing research for the book they interviewed HP President John Young who explained what the term meant and its importance to HP especially during times of explosive growth.  Reflecting back on the concept of MBWA and first learning of its meaning Peter’s writes, “MBWA … Managing By Wandering Around … quickly became our favorite “excellence” idea! Technically, it meant staying in direct touch (damn the bureaucracy!) with the folks who do the work. Metaphorically, it stood for all/much of what was wrong with American management—McKinsey & Harvard Business School-style—as we confronted the Japanese challenge in areas such as product quality. That is, “big business” had become an abstraction. It was a “by the numbers” affair, where front-line “personnel” were pretty much interchangeable parts in a well-oiled “machine” and where “strategy” was considered far more important than primitive ideas such as quality and service and turned-on folks. Of course by then the bearings had lost most of their oil and seized up!”

Ok, I know what you are thinking and you are right, we’re not a giganto conglomerate that has thousands of people working for us at multiple locations!  Yes, this is true, but what is even truer is that on a daily basis small companies must fight against losing their nimbleness, effectiveness, and..well, their human touch.  We believe in measurement and standards, but not at the expense of losing touch and becoming irrelevant.  We believe in knowing our employees, not intrusively, but in such a way that they know they are a valuable member of our team.  We believe in getting out of our offices and wandering around.

Nobody in our company does this better than our President, who regularly practices MBWA and often times finds himself in the middle of lending a hand to one of our employees.  (And on occasion our customers)  There is no substitute for MBWA; it is the lighthouse that steers the small business away from the shoreline of irrelevancy that it is headed for.  Engage in MWBA today…seriously, get up and go wander!

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In short, you do.  We all do.  Furthering ones education increases your knowledge base resulting in you becoming a more valuable commodity.  It can lead to more responsibility, which leads to promotions and thus more salary.   It can lead to higher self esteem as more people look to you for the answers they do not have.  Pursuing education shows your employers you have motivation and drive, both positive qualities in employees.  There is a lot of upside here, so you need knowledge!

Once you have made the commitment to gain knowledge, the next step is determining what kind of knowledge do you want?  Do you want to keep up on current trends on topics concerning your current job?  Do you want to establish yourself as a person “on the rise” in your company?  Do you want to leave your dead end job and find something that appeals to you on a more personal level?  Basically, what is it you want your job to be for you?  Once you have determined what you want, it’s time to find out what you need.  Is there a specific type of knowledge you need?  Is the knowledge you require only available in certain classes or specific seminars?  Do you need to pursue an advanced degree to get the knowledge you want?  There are many ways to get the knowledge you desire.

Two subjects that you need to think about when choosing an education is time and money.  How much time you have to pursue your education and how much you can spend will greatly determine which direction you take on choosing how you want to gain your knowledge.  Hopefully, you are lucky enough to work for a place that will cover your expenses for your search for knowledge, because then it’s all a matter of time.

How does all this affect our company?  Well, we here at Precision Pipe and Vessel, LLC are a diverse group of individuals and our diversity does not stop at our knowledge base and how we reached it.  We have personnel here who received their knowledge base through 4 year degrees, various seminars and classes, the occasional ASME conference, and of course, hard knocks.  Our welders and fabricators are always looking to improve their knowledge base through welding different types of metal using a variety of methods and we comply by teaching them the new methods.  Our office staff are also looking for ways to add to their knowledge through learning new engineering and project management practices.  In fact, one of them recently received their MBA from an accredited college.  So we have a lot of knowledge and are willing to use it to help you get your job done.

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New Year, new beginnings- same results?  That is not so bad when the last year was successful – or is it?

Recently, I have noticed that I am currently NOT doing much in the way of self-improvement other than maintaining the successful practices I have adopted last year.  On the surface this seems benign – after all, if it’s working, why change?  I can’t help but think…..what if?  What if I can add or tweak some of those successful things 2-5% for the better?  Wouldn’t that be worth the time investment to enhance what I do well? Certainly.

In business, we often focus our attention on our defects over the past year and give our organization the same old pep talk involving words such as, “We cannot continue…and/or Knock it off.”  This exercise is well worth the time and effort.  Making efforts NOT to repeat mistakes is always a worthwhile endeavor especially when your competency and reputation is on the line.  What about the things you do well?  Does your organization look to improve upon the good things that you do, even if it is “just” a 2-5% improvement.  (Example:  If your organization is good at turning quotes around what if you improved it by a couple of hours?  Soon, those hours – turn into day(s).)

Sometimes the smallest of efforts to improve what you do well can pay the biggest dividends.

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2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads This blog is doing awesome!.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

The Leaning Tower of Pisa has 296 steps to reach the top. This blog was viewed about 1,200 times in 2010. If those were steps, it would have climbed the Leaning Tower of Pisa 4 times

 

In 2010, there were 23 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 28 posts. There were 17 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 6mb. That’s about a picture per month.

The busiest day of the year was September 21st with 22 views. The most popular post that day was Keeping Your Welders Qualified.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were twitter.com, altavista.com, precision-pipe.com, en.wordpress.com, and thefabricator.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for asme nameplate, asme s stamp, welder continuity record, precision pipe and vessel, and welder continuity log.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Keeping Your Welders Qualified August 2010
1 comment

2

Where does the code boundary end? January 2010
4 comments

3

ASME S-Stamp February 2010

4

Dew Point Processing Plants June 2010
1 comment and 1 Like on WordPress.com,

5

Nice Resume? Make a Weld! May 2010
3 comments

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Tonight we have the opportunity to go into a major sporting arena and perform a weld repair on a pressure vessel. After being in the pressure vessel industry for almost 12 years I sometimes forget that not everyone understands what is involved in this type of undertaking. The repair itself is very simple. The unit has been in service for the last fourteen years and after years of vibration a pinhole or crack has promulgated through the heat effected zone around one of the welds. So the repair will consist of grinding out the defect and welding in new material. Simple enough. It’s the paperwork side of things that most people are not familiar with. ASME does not actually have a “Code” for the repair of Section VIII, Division 1 pressure vessels. Repairs fall under the Nation Board of Inspectors Code (NBIC). The National Board is the agency that contends with the requirements for repairs and alterations. The following list is typical of the process for a repair:

  • Investigate the repair that is required
  • Procure or purchase a copy of the original U1-A report from either the manufacturer or The National Board
  • Review the original U1-A to verify materials of construction, Fabrication requirements, Examination requirements, and Testing requirements
  • Prepare a repair plan that includes a field traveler with hold points for the Authorized Inspector (AI)
    • Identify the weld procedure to be used
    • Identify the welder to be used and verify his/her qualifications
    • Prepare any drawings, calculations, and or engineering data
    • Procure and review documentation of any new material that must be utilized
    • Specify and non-destructive testing that is required
    • Specify any final inspection requirements
    • Specify any Post Weld Heat Treat requirements
    • Specify the type and range of any pressure test that is required
    • Prepare a nameplate
    • Prepare applicable R Form
    • All of the above information must be available for the AI to review
    • Perform the repair as stated in the repair plan
    • Perform testing as required by the NBIC
    • Sign off on the appropriate documentation

As you can see there is more to a “Code” repair the simply fixing the weld. Depending on the vessel the testing portion of the repair plan may take a substantial amount of time. Keep all of these items in mind when you call a company asking that a repair be made the same day as same day service tends to cost a little more. Here at Precision Pipe we jump at these opportunities to start new relationships that hopefully last a life time.

 

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Economy?  From a blog created by a fabrication and welding shop?  What gives?  Well, the economy affects us all and there have been reports that many fabrication shops are having tough times out there.  If this applies to you, try not to fret and utilize your newly discovered spare time accordingly.  Now is the time to look over your business and identify any weak spots you have and work to make these weak spots strengths.  Lack of organization?  Look into methods of streamlining your business.  Databases are a good way to organize information and have it available to all.  Lack of clients?  Now is the time to get creative and think of new directions your business can go in.  Work those marketing skills and look into new avenues of opportunity.  Finding an additional yet different direction can help rejuvenate your workers and can open up skills you never knew your shop had.   Don’t know your workers?  Now would be a good time to talk to them, get to know them and listen to any ideas they may have to improve the company.  It’s amazing how little ideas can often be the start into something big that changes the company for the better.  Finally, remember to be on the lookout for ways to improve safety and cleanliness.  These two are big and can be the difference on whether a customer chooses you to do their job, or a different company.  Utilize your downtime effectively!

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