Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Code’

Precision Pipe & Vessel, is a Denver based ASME welding and equipment fabrication business with ‘NB’ ‘U’ & ‘R’ Stamps and certification. Precision Pipe  designs and builds individual components and complete turnkey skid packages. Precision Pipe has successfully completed more than 4500 jobs since 2000 which include small piping jobs, repairs of pressure vessels, TEMA Type Heat Exchangers, Pressure Vessels, and complete turn key skid packages.

Precision Pipe has a long history of providing cost competitive turnkey packages complete with electrical, instrumentation, controls, and complete engineering packaging. Precision has designed and built many components for installation including: Natural Gas Processing Plants (JT & Refrigeration), Separation, Refrigeration Packages, Dehydration, Compression, Chillers, Line Heaters, Production Units, Cabin Heaters, Tanks, Towers, Stacks, Flares, Boilers, Land Fill Methane Collection.

Although Precision Pipe specializes in Chemical, Oil & Gas processing equipment and facilities, Precision Pipe also has significant domain experience in Renewables, Co2, Prototyping and other process equipment. Precision is staffed with a team of professionals with diverse backgrounds, ingenuity, and the willingness to take risk. We find satisfaction in developing new products and building prototypes. Precision Pipe has helped dozens of companies (including ourselves) develop new products, build fully functional demonstration facilities, and seek patent protection for these innovations. Our product development experience includes gas processing equipment, catalyst, fixed and mobile laboratories, reactors, gasification, alternative fuels, cellulosic biofuels, clean tech, directional drilling, fracking, textiles, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, oder & emissions elimination, distillation, traditional and renewable energy related developments.

At Precision Pipe We are always looking for ways to save our customers money, improve lead-time, and deliver an excellent product. If you haven’t had a chance to work with us, give us a call,  we would love the opportunity to partner with you.IMG_3019

Read Full Post »

Yesterday marked a first for me in my eleven years of working in the ASME world; a welder who stated he could pass a 6G weld test on 2” Schedule 80 carbon steel pipe using the GMAW welding process actually showed me he could do it. It’s amazing to me how many welders come into our shop boasting about their accomplishments and certifications only to completely discredit themselves when it comes time to perform an actual weld. A couple of years ago I had a welder come in and apply for work that had every welding process and material I could ever imagine welding at our facility listed on his resume. His resume looked fantastic! He even had lead man experience and design experience listed on the resume. When I was reading through his certifications and came across ASME 6G MIG certified I was ecstatic! So I asked the question, “Can you pass a 6G MIG test today”? “Of course I can” he boasted.  6G is a one test fits all approach to qualifying welders. If a welder can pass the 6G test he or she is qualified to weld in any position (Vertical, Horizontal, Flat, and Overhead). As such it’s a pretty tough test. The welder must tack weld two pieces of pipe together then secure the two pieces to a jig that holds the pipe to be welded 45 degrees off the horizontal. The welder cannot move the pipe once the welder has started. When in this position the welder is forced to weld vertically, flat, and overhead on the same piece of pipe. Now back to the welder… I set him up in the shop with a welder and some pipe and said “GO”! I went back to my office to let the man work in peace. Twenty minutes later he came through the office with all his tools extremely frustrated and simply said he was leaving. Shocked I went out to see what happened. I found his weld test stuffed way under the table he was working on. It looked HORRIBLE! It had to be (and still is) the worst coupon I had ever seen. Unbelievable! I chocked it up to the fact that no matter what the paper says the caliber of a welder can only be known through testing. The saying you get what you pay for certainly applies to welding. We at Precision Pipe & Vessel have had some extremely high end welding and if we let people who THINK they can weld anything without testing them in the door we will be closing the doors permanently all too soon. In today’s market place we have found that diversity is what works for keeping our doors open and our employees enjoy having a variety of work including the high end stainless steel and other alloy work come in the door. May I suggest if you are a buyer or a purchaser in today’s market that before you go with the least expensive bid you ask for a weld sample along with welder qualifications before you issue the purchase order. Sometimes the “you get what you pay for” can end up costing so much more then expected the cheapest manufacturer is not worth it.

As a follow up, this weld was just made by one of the welders in our shop:

Read Full Post »

When it comes to kicking off a project we usually focus most of our attention and energies in moving the project from beginning to end.   For some of us, there is excitement in the start of a new project and a sigh of relief when the project ends (with a whole lot of hope and nail biting in between).  Not long into the life of a project there comes a sobering reality of the tedious tasks that are required to make a project successful.  Our follow through with these tasks are principal to the outcome and overall success of the project and ultimately how customers perceive us.  Follow through is best achieved within a team environment where every member of the team is using their strengths to maximize the effort given towards the project.   Within a team there is a greater level of accountability and creativity that leads to effective communication and clear direction.  Clear direction leads to efficient work flow and easy identification of bottle necks and other potential problems making your project economical and creating greater margin within your business.

Don’t forget to conduct follow up meetings regularly to track progress.  These brief meeting should be done at the beginning of the day, be brief, and cover what top tasks each team member has to accomplish that day.  Above all, have fun!  The more you enjoy your team and project, the greater strength you have to complete the tasks you have throughout your day.

Read Full Post »

Qualified: Having complied with the specific requirements or precedent conditions

Certify: To attest as being true or as represented or as meeting a standard

Many companies are claiming “certified welding procedures meeting the requirements of AWS and ASME” in their literature and on their websites in hopes of expanding their place in the welding industry to include ASME repairs and new fabrication. Having “certified welding procedures and welders” is only one step in being a “qualified” ASME fabrication facility. In order for a facility to be a legitimate ASME shop they must hold a current certificate and stamp issued by the ASME (http://cstools.asme.org/holdersearch/ ). The ASME only issues a fabrication certificate and a stamp after they have taken the time to review the fabricators quality system that states in writing how the fabricator intends on meeting the applicable ASME code. The welding portion of the QC system is only a small part; the QC system must also include provisions for engineering, procurement, material control, non-conformances, non destructive testing, post weld heat treatment, calibration of test equipment, and data reports and record retention. These are only a few of the sections considered the minimum for a quality control system. In addition to the quality system the fabricator must have a current agreement with a third party inspection agency (such as One Beacon America Insurance) to review and ensure the QC system is being followed. The inspection agency along with a representative of ASME audits the fabricators QC system every three years prior to renewing the certificate. These requirements are in place to make sure that fabricators have controls in place to ensure the safety of the public. Although there may be many fabricators which utilize welding procedures that meet ASME specifications and certify their welders to those procedures customers should take care to ask any potential fabricators for a copy of the quality control manual before they execute a purchase order for welding on ASME certified, stamped product.

http://www.precision-pipe.com

Read Full Post »

The economy has certainly effected work loads and the kind of work many shops are doing this year. In previous years it wasn’t unusual to have a back log of 6 or more months on new products. This year a back log of 2 to 3 is normal for most ASME fabricators. Although the work isn’t coming to us as in years past there are still plenty of opportunities. We have found that there has been a steep increase in repair, recertification, and rerate work for ASME vessels. As one of the few shops with a “S”, “U”, “NB” & “R” stamp we have been able to pursue a broad range of work with clients looking to make due with current equipment. This is a great way to finish projects and keep the bottom line as low as possible. Rerating a vessel can keep a project moving forward using equipment that has already been paid for. Comparatively, rerating or re-certifying a pressure vessel is a mere fraction in price and time but the results are the same. Another great option is finding and reimplementing used equipment. Let’s face it a used tank or vessel will be useful long after any of us are around to care. As a practice in good stewardship not just during tough times using used tanks and vessels can save substantial capital and bring more projects to our companies and to an ultimate completion. In the meantime companies looking for good deals on new equipment have a lot of buying power at this time too. Many shops will be able to provide the same equipment quicker than previous years at reduced rates. End users that have not seen price reductions on equipment should shop around and see if your vendor has become complacent in providing the best deal possible.

Read Full Post »