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Posts Tagged ‘Welding Shop in Denver’

An interesting project has come to our shop that is leading to a new welding procedure. The project is a simple stainless steel pressure vessel, 6” diameter pipe, 0.432” wall approximately 18” long. While this seems overly simple it has led me to investigate the welding options we have qualified for stainless in our shop. We have stainless hardwire, flux core, stick, and TIG procedures but which one to use? Flux core fills very fast, hardwire is clean and neat, TIG has an artistic look when done right but is slower then hardwire and flux core. Stick welding is smoky and unless the welder is REALLY good it just doesn’t look as nice as the others. I’m beginning to think multiple processes. If we hardwire the root then no backing gas is required (meaning we don’t have to purge the inside of the vessel to remove any oxygen exposure on the back side of the weld) then we can fill the majority of the weld joint with either spray arc hardwire or flux core and finish with TIG. We get a solid, quick welded joint that looks like art! But I don’t have a weld procedure that includes three different welding processes. Do I need to break out some stainless steel scrap and weld up a coupon using the three selected processes and have it tested? Conveniently, I do not. Because I have Procedure Qualification Reports (PQR’s) for all three processes I can write a new procedure using the existing PQR’s. I can take the information from each PQR and implement a new procedure that includes all three processes. Each process must be noted on the new weld procedure and the essential variables must also be noted. One other item to be sure to review, the thickness of the additive PQR’s must yield the thickness range required for the intended joint. Maintaining documentation of all our welding processes and procedures makes this an easy accomplishment, an accomplishment that allows us to utilize our knowledge and history to go forward. If you like the way a certain welding process looks but have been told it costs too much or takes too much time, give us a call. We’ll help you find a happy medium that yields beautiful welding and cost effectiveness.

TIG Cover Pass

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I have heard through the rumor mill that there are many companies that are waiting 6, 9, 12, and up to 18 months for TEMA type heat exchangers.  Not our customers!  Precision has built hundreds upon hundreds of TEMA Type heat exchangers for various processing plants through the years.  There are certainly tricks to building good quality heat exchangers (we believe our are as good or better than industry leaders) but all in all they are not too difficult to build.  Because there is nothing secret to the sauce, I cannot say I understand why a project manager or engineering firm would be willing to wait that long for a heat exchanger.

Precision Pipe has provided dozens HTRI designed, ASME certified, TEMA type heat exchangers to a variety of installations this year alone.  We keep hearing a common theme when we receive new purchase orders, “how does Precision Pipe build these so quickly”?  Really I’m not sure why it takes other’s so long, but I guess our advantage is that we are a custom fabrication shop with ASME Code stamps.   This means we don’t sell all of our capacity on a particular engineered product.  Rather, we respond to the needs of our clients by building vessels, components, complete turn key skid packages, tanks, and TEMA type heat exchangers.  We do have a few tricks we have learned since we built our first exchangers in the 1970’s but it isn’t anything magical… just a few tricks of the trade.

If you need high quality engineered Heat Exchangers don’t stand in line months upon months waiting.  Don’t believe for one second that you need a shop that only builds exchangers for a high quality product.  Shop around and see if you can find a shop that is eager to earn your business and can provide you with the same quality or better, HTRI designed, ASME certified, TEMA type heat exchanger(s).  Our turn around time is measured in weeks not months!

http://www.Precision-Pipe.com IMG_1940

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So far 2013 has been all about NGL (Natural Gas Liquids) processing equipment.  Because Precision Pipe has been building process equipment for NGL for over 30 years 2013 has proven to be a very busy year.  In addition, our clients (new and old) are looking for expertise in the field of gas processing equipment design and fabrication.  We have nearly completed fabrication on our 2 NGL process plants this year and we have a 3rd plant on order.  These plants have been turnkey units with fully integrated controls and electrical.  We are still building 1 off pressure vessels and various TEMA type heat exchangers but skid packages seem to be whats driving our markets.

Gas Plant

Precision Pipe, LLC Gas processing plants

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Since this summer Precision Pipe and Vessel, A Denver ASME welding and fabrication shop has built and delivered two 80 foot plus deethanizor and depropoanizer towers.  By all standards these are not the largest towers on the market, but are a large enough to serve a major sector in gas processing plants.  These towers were built in Denver and will be shipped all the way to Pennsylvania for their final installation.  This project was conducted with a Nationwide RFP process and it was discovered the Precision Pipe had a competitive price (even with expensive trucking costs) and even better delivery schedule.

As the gas boom seems to be gaining traction, it seems many ASME shops are becoming back logged with large vessels such as these.  Many gas processing companies turn to the same fabricators over and over again and are willing to wait months for delivery at the expense of production and revenue.  As project managers become familiar with companies they tend to turn to the same companies time and time again.  This is probably a safe bet with long established business relationships, but the petroleum is a high risk high reward kind of business.  From the early stages of drilling, installation, permitting, and well stimulation this is in all reality a high stakes business.

Any company that is seeking a competitive edge should be looking for energetic and motivated businesses qualified to provide the same products on a better delivery date (any ASME code vessel will require the same QA QC and inspection).  The cost of lost production is much more expensive than a few thousand dollars in added cost or even shipping, yet procurement specialist and project managers turn to the same companies over and over again without looking at the competitive advantage they may have by using a new vendor with better delivery times.  As dollars are wasted waiting for equipment it seems more logical to strike up new business relationships based on better delivery schedules. Give us a call and see if we can get you to revenue quicker than your go to guy, you might be surprised!

http://www.precision-pipe.com

Natural Gas Processing Equipment

304 Stainless deethanizer tower

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Everything seemed to be going so well, when all of the sudden we find ourselves thrown under the bus by another team member!  Working on a project with a team of people from different departments, companies, or disciplines it is inevitable someone is going to be thrown under the bus.  It is almost comical to me because I have found myself under the bus many times. I have been thrown under the bus by people I brought on to the job who are protecting their own interest (AKA covering their own butt).  I have been thrown under the bus because I am nice, because I was late or not at the meeting, because I was doing too good of a job, and  I have been thrown under the bus because I was the problem.  In any event it seems inevitable that doing projects with big budgets and tight deadlines people will be thrown under the bus for all sorts of good and not so good reasons.There are some people that are particularly good at throwing co-workers under the bus.  Usually these expert “bus chuckers” are gifted at gab but lack the skill sets that would make them proficient at the task at hand.  The boss likes them because they talk a big talk, are bold in their actions, and kiss up like it’s an olympic sport and they are the reigning world champion.

I like to instill in my employees a different way of conducting business and completing projects.  What you lack in perfection you must make up for in integrity.  This means that personal responsibility must come  first and foremost over the blame game.  The hope is that when an employee makes a mistake they don’t wait for everything to unravel and for panic to ensue.  This is a paradigm that allows for mistakes and mishaps but requires everyone to throw themselves under the bus when the time comes.  This mindset allows for the “human factor” to be real in our company without the need to malign others because of an inevitable error.

This approach has the benefit to us as a company as well as for our clients.  In the world of process equipment, pressure vessels and other custom fabricated products we are always striving to improve cost competitive, time tables, a quality of goods.  While we allow for “new development” we have to also allow for a mistake because sometimes things don’t go as planned.  The errors can make for cost over runs, late delivery, re-work, and all the other complications you hate to see in a project.  Again, some would see this as an opportunity to throw their own client under the bus and try to recover some of the lost profits.  However, I see this approach as a risk reward business strategy that has given Precision Pipe great advantages over our competition in fabrication and assembly techniques. We would never pass along a cost to a client based on our own errors.  In fact once Precision paid more than 100% the cost of a tank because of our own trial and error.  Precision fronted and benefited from 100% of the error and our client was never the wiser as we still delivered in their eyes on time and on budget.

Denver Stainless Steel Welding

Exceeding expectations and standards

Calling a foul or a penalty on yourself is a humbling experience.  You can face the wrath of your customers, co-workers, management, money managers (they seem to be the least risk diverse as a constant in the universe) or even yourself.  However, if you can be transparent the dividends pay in happy customers, good products, leaner fabrication, and better schedules, and good reputation is well worth being labeled as imperfect in execution, but superior by integrity.

http://www.Precision-Pipe.com

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An interesting project has come to our shop that is leading to a new welding procedure. The project is a simple stainless steel pressure vessel, 6” diameter pipe, 0.432” wall approximately 18” long. While this seems overly simple it has led me to investigate the welding options we have qualified for stainless in our shop. We have stainless hardwire, flux core, stick, and TIG procedures but which one to use? Flux core fills very fast, hardwire is clean and neat, TIG has an artistic look when done right but is slower then hardwire and flux core. Stick welding is smoky and unless the welder is REALLY good it just doesn’t look as nice as the others. I’m beginning to think multiple processes. If we hardwire the root then no backing gas is required (meaning we don’t have to purge the inside of the vessel to remove any oxygen exposure on the back side of the weld) then we can fill the majority of the weld joint with either spray arc hardwire or flux core and finish with TIG. We get a solid, quick welded joint that looks like art! But I don’t have a weld procedure that includes three different welding processes. Do I need to break out some stainless steel scrap and weld up a coupon using the three selected processes and have it tested? Conveniently, I do not. Because I have Procedure Qualification Reports (PQR’s) for all three processes I can write a new procedure using the existing PQR’s. I can take the information from each PQR and implement a new procedure that includes all three processes. Each process must be noted on the new weld procedure and the essential variables must also be noted. One other item to be sure to review, the thickness of the additive PQR’s must yield the thickness range required for the intended joint. Maintaining documentation of all our welding processes and procedures makes this an easy accomplishment, an accomplishment that allows us to utilize our knowledge and history to go forward. If you like the way a certain welding process looks but have been told it costs too much or takes too much time, give us a call. We’ll help you find a happy medium that yields beautiful welding and cost effectiveness.

Denver Stainless Steel Welding

TIG Cover Pass

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In short, you do.  We all do.  Furthering ones education increases your knowledge base resulting in you becoming a more valuable commodity.  It can lead to more responsibility, which leads to promotions and thus more salary.   It can lead to higher self esteem as more people look to you for the answers they do not have.  Pursuing education shows your employers you have motivation and drive, both positive qualities in employees.  There is a lot of upside here, so you need knowledge!

Once you have made the commitment to gain knowledge, the next step is determining what kind of knowledge do you want?  Do you want to keep up on current trends on topics concerning your current job?  Do you want to establish yourself as a person “on the rise” in your company?  Do you want to leave your dead end job and find something that appeals to you on a more personal level?  Basically, what is it you want your job to be for you?  Once you have determined what you want, it’s time to find out what you need.  Is there a specific type of knowledge you need?  Is the knowledge you require only available in certain classes or specific seminars?  Do you need to pursue an advanced degree to get the knowledge you want?  There are many ways to get the knowledge you desire.

Two subjects that you need to think about when choosing an education is time and money.  How much time you have to pursue your education and how much you can spend will greatly determine which direction you take on choosing how you want to gain your knowledge.  Hopefully, you are lucky enough to work for a place that will cover your expenses for your search for knowledge, because then it’s all a matter of time.

How does all this affect our company?  Well, we here at Precision Pipe and Vessel, LLC are a diverse group of individuals and our diversity does not stop at our knowledge base and how we reached it.  We have personnel here who received their knowledge base through 4 year degrees, various seminars and classes, the occasional ASME conference, and of course, hard knocks.  Our welders and fabricators are always looking to improve their knowledge base through welding different types of metal using a variety of methods and we comply by teaching them the new methods.  Our office staff are also looking for ways to add to their knowledge through learning new engineering and project management practices.  In fact, one of them recently received their MBA from an accredited college.  So we have a lot of knowledge and are willing to use it to help you get your job done.

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